Ontario Solar Farm Projects Subject to New Regulations

Posted by Admin on August 24, 2012

“The Ontario Power Authority (OPA) launched the next phase of the province’s Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) program.

The most notable change affecting farmers wishing to apply for a FIT project on their farm is a new regulation regarding land classification types. The version 2.0 policy document has tightened limitations for solar projects and solar farms will no longer be allowed on Class 3 or organic soils. This change is in addition to Class 1 and 2 agriculture soil types that don’t allow ground-mounted solar projects.

Other changes were made to project priorities. The new point’s system also takes into consideration factors such as municipal support, aboriginal support, project readiness.  Of course, available grid capacity for the project based on existing electrical infrastructure remains a substantial challenge in many areas.”

Source

FIT Programs As Key Driver For Solar Development in North America

Posted by Admin on August 17, 2012

Both the government of Japan and the Los Angeles municipal utility, launched new feed-in tariffs (FITs) in 2012. Other jurisdictions that have already implemented FIT programs include Calefornia, Vermont, Washington, Hawaii, Ontario, Spain and Germany.

FITs generally require that all electricity output from the solar facility be fed into the grid. By contrast, under net-metering arrangments, the utility bills the customer for net energy usage. There are jurisdictions that offer both FIT and Net-Metering programs such as California, Hawaii, Vermont, Washington and Ontario. In Ontario one may have both a FIT project and a net-metering project on the same property.

FITs are particularly attractive to solar developers in jurisdictions where the FIT price is higher than the retail rate of electricity, such as in Vermont, Ontario and Japan.

Jurisdiction Maximum Project Size Pricing Mechanism
Washington 2MW Fixed-price based on average cost of generation plus 10% rate of return
Vermont 2.2MW Fixed-Price but adopting market-based mechanism by 2013
Hawaii 5MW Fixed-Price
Japan 10MW Fixed-Price with annual adjustment
Ontario 10MW Fixed-Price
Germany 10MW Fixed-Price with annual declines

For more information on Ontario’s FIT program click here.

Source

London Prototype Solar Farm

Posted by Admin on July 13, 2012

London Hydro is the electricity utility provider for the City of London and surrounding areas. The company has been exploring ways to integrate more renewable energy sources into the grid. Solar farms are idle at night and only partially utilized during the day. The research activities with Western University have led to the development of a prototype that will be demonstrated for the first time in Canada in December 2012 at a 10-kilowatt solar farm. More information is available at www.londonhydro.com.

Source

MicroFIT Version 2.0 has Officially Launched

Posted by Admin on July 12, 2012

Microfit 2.0 is now accepting applications from both pre-existing and new applicants. The OPA will commence awarding 50 MW worth of projects.

For existing applicants, those who submitted their applications between September 1st of last year and April 5th of this year will be subject to version 2.0 of the microFIT rules. These applicants must submit a revised application form to the OPA between July 12 and August 10th. Those who submit their applications within this window will keep their original time stamp and reference number and will have priority reviews by the OPA. The pre-existing applications that have not been re-submitted between this window will be terminated.

As for the new applicants, they will also be subject to the new rules and all new applicants must register before applying. New applicants will not be reviewed until all pre-existing applications have been processed. This may take several weeks, and the OPA encourages new applicants to monitor their accounts for updates on their application’s status.

Source

Revision of the FIT Program

Posted by Admin on July 11, 2012

The Ontario Minister of Energy initiated a directive for the Ontario Power Authority to revise the FIT and microFIT rules and go forth in implementing the programs. Click here to read this directive.

Over the next week or so, the OPA will be revising the rules which will be posted with the new edition of the contract form. The government will instruct the OPA to issue and approve the microFIT contracts, then let in a window of smaller FIT projects (under 500 kW). Larger FIT projects are anticipated to commence in early 2013. The announcement from the provincial government is expected shortly.

80% of The United States Could Be Powered using Renewable Energy by 2050

Posted by Admin on July 3, 2012

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) released a study stating that up to 80% of the power needed by the entire United States could be supplied by green energy sources in less than 40 years time. About half of that 80% could even come from solar and wind sources, which are often criticized for unpredictability.

The NREL states that the entire percentage could be achieved using technologies already available in the present day. Each state’s weather patterns could be used for maximum green energy generation. For example, the sunnier states could rely on producing more solar energy, whereas the windier states could generate more wind energy.

The energy section must take action soon. The entire grid must be altered, a smarted grid to balance supply and demand is needed in order to make those numbers predicted by the NREL. While this is a study funded by the Unites States Department of Energy that shows a great future for renewable energy usage, it does not guarantee this shift will occur.

Source

Solar Myths Defeated

Posted by Admin on June 29, 2012

Even though solar panel technology has been around for a long time, a lot of people find themselves hesitant in adopting solar technology on their roofs due to many misconceptions regarding solar panel systems. One myth argues that photovoltaic panels require constant sunlight. However, in reality, panels mostly require UV radiation over direct sunlight. Even when the sky is cloudy, the panels will function with full potential. In fact, panels work even more efficiently when they’re cooler.

Another myth is that pv panels cannot handle winter temperatures and precipitation. However, panels are almost maintenance-free even in the winter. South-facing panels even help melt the snow and keep it off and still collect a lot of solar energy. They also protect the roof from weather damage. Another myth concerns the visual appeal of installing solar panels. While some may think that panels will dampen the esthetic appeal of their property, in actuality, solar panels can even come as solar shingles for a sleek, black roof. They also increase the value of the property and protect the roof from weather damage.

Some people think that solar panels require a lot of maintenance. However, since panels can survive extreme weather conditions such as hurricanes, normal weather will not affect the efficiency of the panel. The panels are easy to clean, all you need to do is hose them off periodically.

Solar energy is efficient, free, does not damage the environment, and will lead to savings in the long run. While the initial investment may seem excessive, they pay for themselves in the long run and save the homeowner a substantial amount of money every year.

To read more about these myths, click here.

To learn more about installing your own solar panel system, contact us today!

Scottsdale, Arizona Solar Energy Projects

Posted by Admin on June 28, 2012

The city of Scottsdale is creating shade and collecting solar energy simultaneously with their plan on installing solar-shade structures in the parking lots of many schools in the area. Through these structures and the installation of pv panels on the rooftops of schools, the school district will cover almost 25% of their energy needs and will save $300,000 every year.

Green Choice Solar, a company based in Scottsdale, recently completed a 1.32 solar system at the Jewish Community Campus, which includes rooftop panels and solar canopies covering 400 parking spaces. This system covers 90% of the campus’s energy needs and will save over $15 million over its lifetime.

All of the planned projects throughout Scottsdale should be complete by this September. This city has been advocating green energy, and specifically solar energy, for over a decade. Green energy is even a requirement in all the municipal buildings.

To find out about having your own solar panel system, click here to find out about Ontario’s solar programs.

Source

Dawson Creek: Taking Solar Energy and Their Green Movement Seriously

Posted by Admin on June 27, 2012

While being in the centre of nonrenewable energy producer areas in Canada, the small city of Dawson Creek ironically shows signs of a small green movement. The mayor even imposed a carbon tax of $100 per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions. All the money collected from this tax goes towards a carbon fund, used to fund green energy projects. Last year, the city emitted 3,600 tonnes, so they put aside $360 thousand towards green initiatives in the city.

Dawson Creek takes their green initiatives seriously, and has completed green audits on public buildings, and even installed solar panels on City Hall. They also reduced their use of natural gas by using solar thermal water systems on high energy-eating buildings such as City Hall, firehall, police station, and airport.

Similar to Dawson Creek, Edmonton is one of the sunniest cities in all of Canada and in 2010, it even began offering a rebate program for home and business owners who installed PV systems connected to the grid. This little city plans on becoming carbon neutral, even if they are located in oil and gas central.

Source

Net Zero Energy Buildings

Posted by Admin on June 25, 2012

Buildings consume almost half of all energy produced in the United States, and the number is growing. The IEA predicts that if India and China’s energy consumptions reach the same levels as the US, their consumption would be four and seven times greater than they have been in recent years.

There have been several plans on improving this consumption, including the plan to use a two-pronged approach. First, all buildings must be designed to consume less energy. Second, the buildings must have a way of generating some energy to offset their consumption. This concept is referred to as NZE (Net Zero Energy Buildings).

The IEA argues that the most effective and affordable method for the energy generation step of the plan is through PV solar panel systems. The decreasing costs of using solar energy have increased interest in this renewable energy generation source.

To find out how to make your property a Net Zero Energy Building, contact us today!

Source

42-400 Creditstone Rd.  |  CONCORD, ONTARIO  |  L4K 3Z2  |  Canada
Phone: 1-888-382-4779  |  Fax:(905) 761-9778  |  e-mail:info@logitestsolar.ca  

© 2012 LogitestSolar INC. Copyright Reserved Designed by Tech Vector Inc.